Science in Recent Philosophies and Histories

Since almost the beginning of written history, at least a relation between mathematical and scientific patterns and the course of human history has been evidenced by the field’s most prolific writers.

Since almost the beginning of written history, at least a relation between mathematical and scientific patterns and the course of human history has been evidenced by the field’s most prolific writers. Charting the rigorous intersection between such scientific fields and the study of philosophy should be no easy task: the overlap is considerable in the pre-modern and modern periods. Here is a brief sketch of the individuals who I have found particularly compelling with respect to such thought, and note that I have been hard-pressed to find the time to read even these scholars, let alone those who have fallen more severely through the cracks.

This study was prepared in February 2021 for private exchange as part of ongoing independent research in the fields of mathematical logic and history.

German-Ottoman Intellectual Ties in Recent Historiography

This paper covers recent trends in historiography on the intellectual ties between Germany and the Ottoman Empire before and during the First World War and evidences the increasing relevance of the field.

Here is a paper that was written for a course on the history of the modern Middle East over the summer of 2020. It covers recent trends in historiography on the intellectual ties between Germany and the Ottoman Empire before and during the First World War and evidences increasing academic interest and relevance in the field. As one of my most recent papers, its quality and style are relatively advanced and the stances I advocate are nuanced and rigorously developed.

The Tres Riches Heures and the Duc de Berry

In this paper, I argue that the Tres Riches Heures is best understood as iterating a distinct intellectual program with an emphasis on the stability and divinity of French cultural rituals associated with both the aristocracy and the labors of the peasants

Here is a link to an essay on the intellectual and iconographic program of the Tres Riches Heures that was written during my Freshman year of college for an upper-level survey course on the Northern Renaissance. In this paper, I argue that the Tres Riches Heures is best understood as iterating a distinct intellectual program with an emphasis on the stability and divinity of French cultural rituals associated with both the aristocracy and the labors of the peasants. Here is a link to this paper’s associated presentation (as a PDF) containing the relevant images.

The Enlightenment and Catherine the Great in Crimea

In this paper, I argue that Catherine the Great used the rhetoric and ideals of the Enlightenment, namely by portraying herself as an enlightened monarch and a liberator, to support her political aspirations in Crimea.

Here is a link to an essay on the rhetoric of the Enlightenment in the Treaty of Kucuk Kaynarca that was written during my Freshman year of college for an upper-level survey course on Russian history to 1800. The Treaty of Kucuk Kaynarca (1774) sealed the Russian annexation of Crimea from the Ottoman Turks a few years later (1783), bringing the peninsula under Russian control for the first time in modern history. In this paper, I argue that Catherine the Great used the rhetoric and ideals of the Enlightenment, namely by portraying herself as an enlightened monarch and a liberator, to support her political aspirations in Crimea. As such, this topic may be of interest to those familiar with the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014, an event that was inflected by cultural and historical context.

The Eucharistic Theology of Henry VIII

Here, I argue that Henry VIII’s perspective on Eucharistic theology likely remained far more consistent before and after his split with the Catholic church than is generally assumed.

Here is a research paper that was written for an upper-level course on Tudor/Stuart English history during my Freshman year of college. In this paper, I argue that Henry VIII’s perspective on Eucharistic theology likely remained far more consistent before and after his split with the Catholic church than is generally assumed. The argumentative content of this paper is structured on a literary and rhetorical analysis of Henry VIII’s 1521 treatise Assertio Septem Sacramentorum.

Byzantine Art in Germany

This paper argues that the Byzantine influences on German art that were prevalent during the reign of the Byzantine empress Theophano (984-991) had a lasting effect on German artistic traditions.

Here is a research paper that was written in the Fall of 2019 for an upper-level undergraduate course on art in medieval western cities. The images associated with this paper may be seen here, in the related in-class presentation that was given to discuss the project.

Specifically, this paper argues that the Byzantine influences on German art that were prevalent during the reign of the Byzantine empress Theophano (984-991) had a lasting effect on German artistic traditions.

Byzantine-German Relations, 1137-1180

The paper deals with Byzantine-German relations through the reigns of the Byzantine Komnenoi emperors John I and Manuel I, with a focus on contemporary geopolitics in the Balkans.

This paper was written through Spring 2018 as a part of a program of directed studies under Dr. Helen Evans, curator of the Byzantine exhibition at the MET in New York City. The paper deals with Byzantine-German relations through the reigns of the Komnenoi emperors John I and Manuel I. Along with my paper on the campaigns of Suleiman I, which was written concurrently during the same season, this was the first research paper that I ever wrote (at the age of 16/17). As such, the argumentative and rhetorical styles are somewhat underdeveloped.

Here is an adapted edition (specifically more argumentative) that was submitted for a survey course on World History taken at NCC in the Fall of 2018. 

The Campaigns of Suleiman I

This paper presents a reassessment of the political and economic ramifications of the Ottoman sultan Suleiman I’s military campaigns

Here is a research paper that was written in Spring 2018 for a survey course on World History at NCC. It deals with the political and economic ramifications of Suleiman I’s military campaigns. Along with my paper on Byzantine-German relations, which was written concurrently during the same season, this was the first research paper that I ever wrote (at the age of 16/17). As such, the argumentative and rhetorical styles are extremely underdeveloped. That being said, I still subscribe generally to the thesis of this work, which is that the Ottoman empire had already begun to decline by the time of Suleiman’s reign.